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Handan Brennah McGoldDay

Handan Brennah McGoldDay

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CCC: Graphic Design Interview Tips

What kinds of questions are asked in a graphic design job interview?
Much like interviews in any other professional industry, the employer, HR manager or whoever the hirer may be, will be meeting you to find out more about your experience, particular skills, attributes, ambitions and general compatibility with the company or brand you’d be working for.
Different people will have their own methods and style of doing this but many similar questions and discussion topics will tend to arise.
Some of these may include:
  • Which pieces in your portfolio are you most proud of / excited about and why?
  • Can you describe your broad creative process - what are the steps you take in creative problem solving?
  • How proficient are you with various design software?
  • How do you go about collaborating with other stakeholders, such as project managers, copywriters and developers?
  • How do you respond to feedback either from a client or team member?
  • How do you manage tight deadlines? Can you share an example of a project you had to complete under a lot of pressure?
  • What do you identify as your biggest strengths - and weaknesses?
  • Which brands do you most admire from a design perspective and why?
  • How do you define a successful team? And a successful creative project - in a business context.
How to ace an interview?
Creative recruiters, Major Players, share the following advice:

Research
You can never know too much about the agency you’re going to meet. Use as many of the tools at your disposal to understand anything that relates to the company. This can be any big business wins, positive PR or something as simple as checking out the person you’re meeting on LinkedIn and using their profile to establish common ground. It shows that you’re the type of person that comes prepared- but most importantly… it shows that you’re interested.

Know your CV
It’s crucial that your CV is completely up-to-date and tailored to the role that you are interviewing for. It may seem trivial, but studying what you have outlined in your CV will ensure that you can clearly outline your previous experience and relevance to the role when answering your interviewers questions!

Remember that an interview is two way street
Candidates can sometimes be led to believe that their job is to turn up and answer questions, but this is a chance for you to find out what you need to about the company, the staff, the structure, the progression and the culture. Asking questions reassures the interviewer that you’re present and engaged and that you’re putting your best foot forward.

Examples
Don’t be afraid to bring examples of your best work- if you have anything relevant that you can bring into the meeting that further demonstrates that you are suitable to the role then by all means do. Just make sure that you clear it with the client or your recruitment consultant in advance, just in case any arrangements need to be made to facilitate your examples.

Evaluate
Do whatever you can to ensure that you don’t come out second guessing how it went. Never be afraid to evaluate as you go on; ask if there’s anything else that the interviewer wants to know, or if there’s anything that they felt you never answered as clearly as they would have liked you to. Make sure you let them know that you want to progress to the next step and ask them what they next steps will be. That way you won’t be wrestling with your thoughts for a day or two while you await feedback.
How to ace an interview?
Creative recruiters, Major Players, share the following advice:

Research
You can never know too much about the agency you’re going to meet. Use as many of the tools at your disposal to understand anything that relates to the company. This can be any big business wins, positive PR or something as simple as checking out the person you’re meeting on LinkedIn and using their profile to establish common ground. It shows that you’re the type of person that comes prepared- but most importantly… it shows that you’re interested.

Know your CV
It’s crucial that your CV is completely up-to-date and tailored to the role that you are interviewing for. It may seem trivial, but studying what you have outlined in your CV will ensure that you can clearly outline your previous experience and relevance to the role when answering your interviewers questions!

Remember that an interview is two way street
Candidates can sometimes be led to believe that their job is to turn up and answer questions, but this is a chance for you to find out what you need to about the company, the staff, the structure, the progression and the culture. Asking questions reassures the interviewer that you’re present and engaged and that you’re putting your best foot forward.

Examples
Don’t be afraid to bring examples of your best work- if you have anything relevant that you can bring into the meeting that further demonstrates that you are suitable to the role then by all means do. Just make sure that you clear it with the client or your recruitment consultant in advance, just in case any arrangements need to be made to facilitate your examples.

Evaluate
Do whatever you can to ensure that you don’t come out second guessing how it went. Never be afraid to evaluate as you go on; ask if there’s anything else that the interviewer wants to know, or if there’s anything that they felt you never answered as clearly as they would have liked you to. Make sure you let them know that you want to progress to the next step and ask them what they next steps will be. That way you won’t be wrestling with your thoughts for a day or two while you await feedback.

Project Tags

  • Interview
  • Tips
  • Jobs
  • career
  • recruitment

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