Flirting Pavilions

I designed these two pavilions intended as a social experiment exploring our current concept of communication. They are located on opposite sides of the river Thames, one underground in Brunel’s shaft, the other on top of Wapping station. Represented as equal and opposites of each other in form and circulation, they are designed to each be inhabited by one person for 12 hours. Brunel’s is accessed through the top and carries you downwards, while Wapping guides you in an upward direction, both follow the same sequence of spaces defined by a typical routine one might have between coming home from work and leaving the next morn- ing. The design mimics the concept of a clock, with a light ‘hand’ encouraging natural circulation, conducting the users through the series of ‘rooms’ simultaneously.

While in the space users can interact through subtle light technologies; at times these can be controlled, while at others points optical shifts act as reminders of the ghostly presence of your counterpart in the opposite pavilion.

The project explored themes of displacement, of an architecture that had subliminal effects on you through light, and which subtlety mirrors the body guiding it through a series of logical processes.