What did people do to make money before they got a long term job? | The Dots

What did people do to make money before they got a long term job?

I'm grafting for my next creative placement (got a book, partner, contacts etc). However, like everyone else, I still need to pay bills.

I used to work in hospitality, but those jobs are a little over subscribed right now for obvious reasons.

I've got a couple creative projects that keep me entertained by don't make any money.

I'm currently considering making things to sell online (think macrame, plant holders etc.) or trying to get temp work as a receptionist.

If anyone has any advice - I'm all ears.

Replies3

  • Throughout my studies I also worked in hospitality - in bars and cafes. I found it really useful for when I moved countries and had to start from zero again re contacts and opportunities. Having some alternate work aside from purely chasing your creative ambitions can be refreshing and even potentially a route to clients down the line. I often ended up doing paid work for people I had met or had been introduced to via these part-time jobs. Make a website to showcase your work, if you don't already, and push your services to family and friends. There are plenty of ways of getting your designs out there for £ via competitions and initiatives such as Everpress too. Good luck!
  • Hey Bethany, during the time of transition I have offered my services for free and ask of them, if they enjoy my quality of work, send me referrals from their network. Providing free value today pays dividends tomorrow.

    In addition to that, there are opportunities in the unconventional hours (after work hours) as building security. Wishing you all the best!
  • Not sure how possible it is in this climate, but my best non-creative casual jobs were working at call centres doing market research phone interviews. Other ideas you could look at might be any kind of office admin (e.g. data entry) that you can do remotely? There are also market research sites you can sign up to for the chance to be paid to complete surveys, though in my experience I've only been selected for one of those once (£40 for 20min of work though, not bad).

    Other options are sites like Bidvine and Fiverr. I've used Fiverr before and made a little bit of money — not much, and I don't really like the way it's kind of devalued design work, but better than nothing haha :)

    Making things to sell online sounds like a good way to start building your brand/audience as a creative, but if your top priority for now is to make money, then I'd pursue something more stable/reliable like temp work (maybe in addition to crafts too).

    Best of luck!

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